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Today New City Initiative is comprised of 51 leading independent asset management firms from the UK and the Continent, managing approximately £400 billion and employing several thousand people.

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Brexit - Still far from settled

Brexit - Still far from settled

To say the timing of AIMA’s (Alternative Investment Management Association) Global and Regulatory Policy Conference in Dublin was fortuitous is an understatement, happening less than one day after the UK and EU announced a conditional agreement for a transition or implementation period, potentially giving businesses an additional 21 months to finalise their Brexit planning. The word conditional here is very important because the transitional arrangement will only be formalised if the withdrawal treaty is fully agreed.

To summarise one AIMA attendee, "it is an agreement conditional on an agreement." Any number of issues could wreck UK-EU negotiations over the next 12 months including the future status of the Northern Ireland border; Spanish disagreement over Gibraltar; or even insistence from nationalistic Greeks that a Brexit transition be somehow linked to the immediate return of the Elgin Marbles (sadly not a joke).

If no withdrawal agreement is ratified, a Hard Brexit in March 2019 beckons. Despite all of the vainglorious media reports over the last 48 hours, it is very difficult to see what has actually changed. EU regulators – conscious of this misplaced optimism - have been at pains to stress that the risk of a no-deal is not a remote possibility, but something which organisations should still be actively provisioning for.

As such, fund managers must not over-analyse this relative thawing of Brexit negotiations, but should continue making preparations to ensure EU access – assuming they still want it – is still available to them following the UK’s departure. With delegation and reverse solicitation’s future both looking increasingly precarious in the AIFMD review, now is the time for firms to consider whether they create subsidiaries in the EU-27.

On the basis that there is unlikely to be any certainty around Brexit until early next year, the decision to relocate will have to be made blindly.  However, regulators at the AIMA event warned UK fund managers and banks that establishing shell companies inside the EU to game market access will not be tolerated post-Brexit. A number of EU regulators have also told managers that authorisations could take time if submissions all occur concurrently, and are recommending that firms send over their applications by mid-2018.

The other big risk for asset managers is fragmentation. Recent statements from EU regulators have been revealing. While fragmentation is not ideal, many EU regulators seem resigned to the fact it will happen, and have urged firms to plan for it.  For boutiques, this risks adding more costs to their operations if they are marketing into the UK and EU. Managers should start factoring these potential costs into their businesses, and build buffers accordingly.