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Today New City Initiative is comprised of 48 leading independent asset management firms from the UK and the Continent, managing approximately £400 billion and employing several thousand people.

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EU Cross-Border Marketing Proposals Fall Short

EU Cross-Border Marketing Proposals Fall Short

In 2015, New City Initiative (NCI) partnered with Open Europe and produced a paper – Asset Management in Europe: The Case for Reform – which acknowledged that despite the availability of passporting under the UCITS and AIFMD regimes, various impediments levied at a national level stifled the seamless cross-border distribution of EU-regulated fund products across member states.

These restrictions, NCI calculated, created 1.5 million euros of initial costs to a UK-based fund manager distributing across the EU-27 (plus Switzerland), and a further 1.4 million euros in on-going Annual maintenance costs. NCI notified EU and UK regulators about this anomaly and the detrimental impact it was having on boutiques raising EU funds at a time when Growing regulatory and operational requirements were eating into margins.

Shortly thereafter, it was announced the Capital Markets Union (CMU), an initiative welcomed by NCI at the time, contained among some of its policy objectives a commitment to make cross-border distribution of EU fund structures (AIFs, UCITS, ELTIFs, EUVECAs, EUSEFs) more efficient, by removing some of these national barriers and obstacles flagged by NCI among other industry bodies and associations.  

In March 2018, the European Commission (EC) came up with a set of proposals designed to expedite cross-border distribution of EU regulated fund products. To summarise, the proposals do not exactly tally with what NCI or other industry associations had in mind, mainly because they introduce even more obligations and complexities for firms marketing into the EU to deal with. Arguably, this is the exact opposite of what was being called for by the industry.

Nonetheless, there are some small wins for asset managers to take home, primarily around local regulatory costs and charges. A persistent irritation – and one that was outlined in NCI’s paperback in 2015 – was that home and host state regulators levied fees on AIFMs and UCITS during the authorisation and registration process, which were not homogenised, thereby discouraging EU funds from distributing beyond just a handful of markets.

A report on the CMU proposals by law firm William Fry said that while local regulators can still levy charges on AIFMs and UCITS during authorisations and registrations, these must be proportionate to the regulator’s own costs, and they must publish all fees and charges on their websites, and notify ESMA accordingly. The same report said that while this change was modest, it was welcome, a view shared by NCI.

Less welcome, however, is the EC’s stance on pre-marketing, a vaguely defined concept that allows firms to avoid notifying EU regulators and complying with AIFMD and UCITS while they make preliminary contact with investors provided they adhere to some very strict conditions. The lack of EU-wide standardisation has always meant that pre-marketing in one jurisdiction (i.e. the UK) may contradict the marketing rules in another country.

Having not previously demarcated where the boundaries for pre-marketing actually were, the EC has sought to instil some clarity under CMU for the benefit of its member states and fund managers. The EC said that pre-marketing was the “direct or indirect provision of information on investment strategies or investment ideas by an AIFM or on its behalf to professional investors domiciled or registered in the Union to test their interest in an AIF that is not yet established.”

In addition, pre-marketing does not allow managers to share draft prospectuses or offering documents with investors. This latter proposal is certainly more constraining than the existing approach taken in the UK where it is permissible under pre-marketing rules to share draft documentation with investors – provided prospects are not obliged to enter into a binding agreement afterwards.

In the short-term, the rules are likely to rile the UK, which takes a fairly tolerant attitude towards pre-marketing versus other constituents in the EU27, but its lasting impact may be felt elsewhere, especially among third country managers. Many non-EU firms (including UK managers post-Brexit) have expressed alarm that legitimate practices under reverse solicitation could well be outlawed under the new pre-marketing rules.

This leaves few options for third country managers looking to run EU money after Brexit. Firms can either comply with AIFMD and then build the appropriate infrastructure around it, or just assiduously study the pre-marketing rules being put forward by the EU and ensure they do not break them (i.e. do not market inside the EU period).